Some models actually beat their posted range estimates, the group said, including German brands BMW and Mercedes.  -  IMAGE: Pexels/Pixabay

Some models actually beat their posted range estimates, the group said, including German brands BMW and Mercedes.

IMAGE: Pexels/Pixabay

Electric vehicles’ posted ranges between charges aren’t always accurate, according to newly released test results by Consumer Reports.

New EVs indicate Environmental Protection Agency range estimates posted on window stickers and on the U.S. Department of Energy’s website. But almost half the 22 models Consumer Reports has tested so far are off the mark, based on research the nonprofit group conducted this past summer.

Range accuracy may not be as important for the shorter trips many EV owners take from day to day, the organization said, but can be crucial on long road trips.

“Range is much more important when you’re far from home and away from reliable charging,” said the group’s manager of auto testing and insights, Alex Knizek, in a report on the test findings.

To gauge range, Consumer Reports drove fully charged EVs on highways at a steady 70 mph, it said, stopping when their batteries were fully out of power. It said almost half of the models failed to reach their posted ranges. The biggest disparity was in the Ford F-150 Lightning pickup, which stopped operating after 270 miles, 50 miles under its posted range.

Some models actually beat their posted range estimates, the group said, including German brands BMW and Mercedes, which exceeded theirs by more than 40 miles.

Consumer Reports said it’s asked the EPA to add a highway-speed range test like its for the agency's range estimations.

For more details, visit Consumer Report's test results page.

DIG DEEPER: Tesla Now Probed Over EV Ranges

Originally posted on Auto Dealer Today

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